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Axel Bio Corporation (ABCorp), in compliance with federal safety guidelines, is dedicated to promoting FDA510(k) and CE marks approved safety syringes for the healthcare providers to enhance anti-needlesticking injuries.


Source: WHO & SING www.immunize.org/genr.d

Needlestick injuries and other sharps-related injuries due to occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens continue to be an important public health concern throughout the world.


 

Diseases resulting from accidental needlesticks can infect anyone involved in the delivery of healthcare, including patients, physicians, nurses, and other caregivers, as well as support personnel ranging from housekeeping to employees of sanitation and environmental service firms.

World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that there are about 12 billion injections administered annually, 50% of which are considered unsafe, including accidental needlestick injuries.



Frequency of injury cases caused by different types of medical sharp objects in USA
(63 hospitals, 3003 cases reviewed; Source: Ippolito, 1997).

In the United States, CDC (Center for Disease Control and Prevention, USA) estimates that among all injury cases, there are 600,000 to 1000,000 cases of accidental needlesticking injuries annually, which was about an accident occurring every 30 seconds .

Nevertheless, this statistics is known to be underestimated, given that only 1/3 of all needlestick incidents are officially recorded¹. In reality, the number of accidental needlesticking injuries might be higher than what was recorded, making the needlestick prevention an undelayed concern for the healthcare community.

Legislation

To resolve this situation, the US Congress passed the Needlestick Safety and Prevention Act that became law on November 6, 2000. To further fulfill the requirements of this act, OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration, US Department of Labor) has revised its Bloodborne Pathogens Standard.


Federal Needlestick Safety and Prevention Act
(Signed by President Bill Clinton, Nov. 6, 2000).

The revised standard clarifies the need for employers to:

  1. Select safer needle devices. Involve employees in identifying and choosing these devices.
  2. The updated standard also requires employers to maintain a log of injuries from contaminated sharps.

With implementation of the safety syringes, there is a significant decrease in needlestick injuries that occurred in the hospitals.


Change in incidence of needlestick injuries over a six year period (Source: American Journal of Infection, 2001).

Moreover, WHO has also requested the member countries to employ single use injection equipment or other devices equipped with safety mechanisms so to reduce the repeated usage of needles and prevent the communicable disease caused by needlestick injury.
 


Cost Effectiveness

The US CDC estimates that the average expense for clinical evaluation and follow-up treatment per needlestick injury varies from $2000 to $3000. This has generated an estimate of $3 billion of cost in treatment and compensation in lieu of ~ 1000,000 cases of sharps injuries reported annually. Tragically the most costly is the one involved in treating an HIV-infected individual reaching well over $500,000. According to Exposure Prevention Information Network (EPINet) statistical information², the incidences were reduced by 92% after the implementation of safety syringe and this statistics has been increasingly improving. The California Occupational Safety and Health Standards Board estimates that the use of safety syringes would generate a savings of approximately $215 million to $365 million per year in California alone. Thus, this saving generated directly or indirectly by using safety syringes is far exceeding its cost. While educational programs for enhancing understanding of needlestick safety and prevention have been progressively improved (See above), it appears that implementing safety devices/syringes is the most effective way for healthcare providers to avoid direct contact with infected needles.

More importantly, it has been reported that safety syringes not only reduce the number of accidents but also reduce the medical costs for the society³.


If you would like to learn more about the needlestick safety and bloodborne pathogens, please click here for download!

References:

  1. Contamination incidents among doctors and midwives: reasons for non-reporting and knowledge of risks. Occup Med (Lond), 47(6), 357-60.1997, Burke, S., & Madan, I.
  2. Sharp object injury report, EPINet, 1997 and 1999.
  3. Evaluating safer needles, A Unison Guide “NEEDLE SAFETY AT WORK”, Number 2; To Hospital Administrators, Directors of nursing, Risk Managers, and Infection Control Directors, Occupational Safety & Health Administration.
  1. Contamination incidents among doctors and midwives: reasons for non-reporting and knowledge of risks. Occup Med (Lond), 47(6), 357-60.1997, Burke, S., & Madan, I.

    Sharp object injury report, EPINet, 1997 and 1999.
     
  2. Evaluating safer needles, A Unison Guide “NEEDLE SAFETY AT WORK”, Number 2; To Hospital Administrators, Directors of nursing, Risk Managers, and Infection Control Directors, Occupational Safety & Health Administration.
     
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